Friday, 9 January 2015

A tutorial unravelling the mystery of Crocheting a Chevron Blanket.

I am always so grateful to all my lovely followers who leave encouraging and supportive comments on my blog.

Among them I have noticed that some people think working a Chevron pattern is too difficult,complicated or beyond their expertise. Well I wanted to write this post to change the thinking on that. If it was tricky,difficult or complicated the Chevron blankets I have made would be in the cupboard of doom under the stairs!!!!

I have been thinking about this post all week and don't want it to be too wordy but for it to act like a key. So that you can simply just get going.

Chevron Crochet for blankets.

NB I always work in the top of the stitches from the previous rows not the gaps between them.

My advice may not follow the normal patterns, but by relaxing a little .... And adapting a " don't worry,be happy hooking" approach maybe things will seem easy and clear.

Firstly you need to decide how wide you want your blanket to be. Then work a chain that long and add on a few chains for good measure.

I have worked a chain as evenly as I can of 152 chains and I work a few more just to make sure it works out at the end of the foundation row. If this proves to be too narrow for you an extra few rounds on the border soon sorts that. I have found it perfect for a baby's blanket for use in the car seat,pushchair or tummy time and hopefully in time to be dragged around the place as a perfect comforter.

 

Decide how wide you want the arrow parts of your chevron blanket to be apart . To give you an idea in this blanket they are 8 trebles apart.

 

In this one they are 12 Trebles apart.

 

 

And finally in this one they are 7 Trebles apart . I think it's good to choose which appeals to you most.

 

 

The Chevron pattern is basically made up of points at the top of the pattern and points at the bottom. It almost makes the blankets have a 3D effect.


Once you have decided upon the width you desire start your foundation row. This sets the pattern for the whole blanket so counting is essential. I actually count all the time. It becomes a rhythmic,relaxing mantra and pays massive dividends to the end look of your blanket. It keeps it even and removes any chance of it getting wider or narrower at any point .Essential for the final result.
So,for this blanket I am going to choose 10 trebles between the chevron points.
Count the first two chains as your first treble and then starting in the 3rd treble from your hook work 10 trebles in the next 10 chains.
 
Starting in the next treble we are going to work the first Chevron point. Try to put your hook through two threads of the chain you are working as it keeps the chevron point firmer.
( Ignore the finished blanket on my lap it's keeping me warm on this cold January day. We are concentrating on the Jade Green chain!)
Work 2 trebles, 1 chain, 2 trebles in this chain and then work 10 trebles in the next 10 chains.
Miss 2 chains and work 10 more trebles. This little bit of magic sets the pattern for your chevrons.
 

Work these two patterns to the end of the row. It is so easy to see you have it correct because of the way you have the top of the chevron and the bottom. Ignore the little tail of chains you have left over as these can be sewn in later.
Careful counting during these early rows really does set you up for a perfect result!
 
Chain 2 for the turn. Work 10 trebles. You are at the first Chevron point of this row. Miss 2 chains. Work 10 trebles.

Work 2 trebles,1 chain,2 trebles. And continue in this way to the end of the second row.
 
This setting of the pattern in sets of 10 trebles between the Chevrons is the key. You might find that at the end of the row there is a spare stitch ( don't worry)
 
 
Crochet the two remaining stitches together.
Resulting in a lovely neat edge. You might find that conversely it seems that you do not gave enough chains left at the end of the row to complete your 10 trebles. In that case just work 2 trebles in the last space. As long as you have sets of 10 at all times all will be well and there will be NO frogging back.
Then chain 2 and turn. It is so easy to see how you are progressing . The pattern of chevrons should sit exactly above each other.
This is true when you look at a completed blanket the little holes make a straight line from the top to the bottom of your blanket.
 

 

I like to work 3 rows of one colour and then change but it's entirely a matter of taste. Working odd numbers of rows of colour allows the joins to be on both sides.

I will post about borders in my next post and if you have any questions please do not hesitate to email me .

I hope you will soon be hooking happily away and making a lovely blanket . " Dartmoor Dreaming" is so easy yet so effective.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22 comments:

  1. Good explanation, I've always made my chevron afghans using a single crochet, I think I'd like doing it with a treble even better.

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    1. I think you would love the way it grows.... Yours must look beautiful.

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  2. A wonderful tutorial, love some of your blankets, a real delight.

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    1. Thank you so much. I gave to say blankets are my favourite things to make and Chevron my favourite pattern

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  3. I agree - it's really not complicated at all once you get into the rhythm of it. A great tutorial too which I'm sure will prove most informative - well done!
    Happy weekend,
    hugs xx

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    1. Thank you Gilly. The very essence of the rhythmic pattern keeps my interest and purpose when making the Chevron blankets.

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  4. This is one of the best chevron tutorials I have seen. I am a complete chevron novice. Would this work if I crocheted in the spaces instead of the top of the stitches? I usually find that easier.

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    1. It would Una . I have just counted on the piece I am working on and I am sure it would be fine.( it won't grow as fast though) thank you so much for your kind words about the tutorial. As long as you follow the principles of the stitches at the Chevron points and count carefully you will be fine. It really dies become a rhythmic pattern. And the joy is you immediately see if you have made a mistake because the pattern does not sit on top of each other in an orderly fashion. Good Luck and I will really look forward to watching your progress.
      Please spread the word about my tutorial as it would be lovely to get more Chevroners on board. Happy hooking!

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    2. Thanks,Linda.I'm planning to add a link to your tutorial on my Pinterest page. So you will hopefully have plenty of hits. I have a few other project in the pipeline, but will definitely make this at some stage. I'm challenging myself a bit more this year!

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  5. Gorgeous blankets. I've not made a chevron blanket - but I have made a couple of ripple ones. They are very rhythmic and therapeutic too. Wishing you a great weekend. x

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    1. Thank you Sara. I have made ripples too but found I did not concentrate so much and sometimes had made a mistake without realising it. Thank you so much for popping in.

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  6. I have done chevron in the past, but then tried Lucy at Attic24's "neat ripple" which I now prefer as there aren't the holes at the tops of the points. But yours are awesome and it was very nice of you to provide a tutorial. ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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    1. Thank you Teresa. I have made ripples too but am a bit of a scatterbrain and often made a mistake and had to go back. I think the sharpness of the chevrons keep me on track a bit more. Thanks for popping in x

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  7. My friend Jan (Jan Eaton) has written some really good crochet books and this is one of her designs. The design is not complicated, you just have to remember how the waves are formed!
    Julie xxxxxxxx

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    1. I must get Jan's book from the library as I am sure I would enjoy reading it. Thank you so much for the tip x x x

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  8. It's interesting to see the difference it makes to have fewer or more trebles, I think the tighter ones suit the little blanket and the longer chevrons work really well on the larger sizes, I've never noticed that before :)

    I haven't made a chevron blanket before but I've done a ripple which was quite easy and really satisfying I thought, I didn't get bored like I do when I'm crocheting straight rows. I especially like your last photo, those colours really sing to me!

    Thanks for the tutorial :-) I may have to give this a go sometime x

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    1. Good luck with it . I am sure you will love it when it is done. I agree about the different number of trebles. It takes me a while to feel confident changing things but it's nice to be able to ring the changes. Thanks for popping in.

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  9. One of these days, when I learn to crochet...........this will be very helpful. Thanks!

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  10. I wondered how the chevron worked as opposed to the ripple, and now I know! Thank you so much Linda, so clever of you and how great that you explained it too! xx

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  11. I am SO glad I found your other blog! I am also so happy that you've done a whole post on the Chevron because I have started and unravelled mine THREE times last week and confined the scraps to the bottom of my work basket! I just couldn't get to grips with it but now I have no excuse. I also love all your colourways so will take inspiration from them too. THANKS, Linda. xxx

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  12. Ps Rod was 70 yesterday!! Hard to believe, eh?

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